Blogs  Forums  Chat Rooms  NHS Direct  NHS Choices  Samaritans  FRANK  Childline  
  Become a Volunteer with FCServices  
.....counselling for everyone.....
Free and Confidential      Face-to-face       Phone / text       Online
+44 1208 220485

+44 843 636 5211

+44 843 636 5210  (Fax)

Text  INFO  to  +44 7516 440 324

enquire@free-counselling-services.co.uk

"....ask for help, talk to others, be yourself...."
Free Counselling Services
  HOME  Contact Us  Our Services  
  Health Campaigns  Emergency Contacts  Charities  
Create a web page in minutes!
.....just need to talk?

.....personal
.....private
.....flexible

Self-Help for Anxiety

There are many ways that you can ease the symptoms of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) yourself.


Exercise:

Regular exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, will help you to combat stress and release tension. It also encourages your brain to release the chemical serotonin, which can improve your mood. Aim to do a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate exercise, at least five days a week. Moderate exercise should make you feel slightly out of breath and tired. Going for a brisk walk is a good example.


Relaxation:

As well as getting regular exercise, learning how to relax is important. You may find relaxation and breathing exercises helpful, or you may prefer activities such as yoga or Pilates to help you unwind.


Diet:

Changing your diet may help ease your symptoms. Too much caffeine can make you more anxious than normal. This is because caffeine can disrupt your sleep and also speed up your heartbeat. If you are tired, you are less likely to be able to control your anxious feelings.


Smoking and drinking:

Smoking and alcohol have been shown to make feelings of anxiety worse. Drink alcohol in moderation and, if you smoke, try to give up. The Department of Health recommends that men should not drink more than three to four units of alcohol a day and women no more than two to three units.


Support groups:

Support groups can give you useful advice about how to effectively manage your anxiety. They are also a good way to meet other people with similar experiences. Support groups often involve face-to-face meetings where you can talk about your difficulties and problems with other people. Many support groups also provide support and guidance over the phone or in writing. Ask your GP about local support groups for anxiety in your area.


Understanding your anxiety:

Some people find that reading about anxiety can help them deal with their condition. There are many books and articles based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). These may help you understand your psychological problems better and learn ways to overcome them by changing your behaviour.


Stress and Anxiety Counselling online
 
 

©2014 Free Counselling Services (FCS) Limited

Not for Profit Organisation, Limited by Guarantee

Registered in England and Wales, No. 08497789


Established in 2012 by Sean Kyle